Archive for September, 2015

Opening Doors: Scarcity

September 29, 2015

Our staff recently read Eldar Shafir and Sendhil Mullainathan’s book Scarcity in preparation for Eldar Shafir’s presentation at our fall conference. The book explores the science of scarcity, or having less than you feel you need, such as time, money, or energy, and how that scarcity impacts our brains. Here are five facts from the book that blew our minds:

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New Book on Workforce Development Policies

New Book on Workforce Development Policies

September 24, 2015

Seattle Jobs Initiative is pleased to announce the release of a collaborative new book, Transforming U.S. Workforce Development Policies for the 21st Century.

SJI’s own policy director David Kaz contributed a chapter in this book, entitled “Basic Food Employment and Training: How Washington State Brought to Scale Skills Training for Its Food Stamp Population”.

Readers can download the entire book as well as individual chapters of the book here.

BOOK DETAILS

The Federal Reserve Banks of Atlanta and Kansas City ...

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Opening Doors: Day of Caring

Opening Doors: Day of Caring

September 24, 2015

This past Friday was United Way of King County’s Day of Caring, the largest volunteer event in Washington State, and we were so grateful for the service of the volunteers on our project, Computers2Careers!

With the help of thirteen Microsoft volunteers, SJI hosted a computer give-away and skills training for our Career Pathway program participants. Career Pathways provides short-term and long-term training in growing industry sectors and wrap-around support services to low-income individuals, creating opportunities for participants to ...

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Opening Doors: Falling Off the Cliff

Opening Doors: Falling Off the Cliff

September 22, 2015

In our previous blog post, we discussed realities of benefits programs in the U.S. and the common gaps that cause those who are not meeting their basic needs to be ineligible to receive benefits. Benefits are lower than many realize, and funding shortages severely limit how many qualifying families receive aid. However, if one is able to secure multiple forms of benefits, increase their income and begin to raise their family out of poverty, they now must worry ...

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Beyond the Headlines — Aid Like a Paycheck

 

Aid Like a Paycheck: New Concept in Financial Aid May Help Students with Money Management & Mental Bandwidth

What do low-income college students in the U.S. and Indian sugar cane farmers have in common? On the surface, not much. However, both get large cash infusions once or twice a year – in the form of financial aid refunds or harvest payments – making them flush with cash at those times, but stretched thin most of the time.

Being short on financial resources ...

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Opening Doors: Safety Nets, or Lack Thereof

Opening Doors: Safety Nets, or Lack Thereof

September 15, 2015

SNAP, Medicaid, Section 8. Many of us recognize the names of the various public benefits available in the United States whether or not we have used them. However, if we haven’t had to access them, we may not have a clear picture of their function and scope – or the challenges that come with trying to navigate through them. The collection of programs is designed to help not only those living in poverty, but also those living near ...

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Opening Doors: Behavioral Economics

Opening Doors: Behavioral Economics

September 3, 2015

Why would someone, already in debt, take out a payday loan, knowing they will not be able to pay off the exorbitant interest?

Why would a minimum wage worker, counting on every penny of their paycheck, neglect to show up to work?

Here at SJI, we’ve spent the last few months learning about behavioral economics in an effort to understand these and related scenarios. In addition to releasing a policy report about behavioral economics and workforce development, we’ve ...

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